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20121217
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
you do is say, we are in trouble, we will borrow in loans and give it to people. that is called greece. that is what the trade minister said. they are not serious about welfare, the deficit, or a serious party. everybody can see it. >> order. >> double very much. will the prime minister join me and the whole crowd in sending our condolences -- we urge anybody who wants to donate to the king edward the seventh memorial fund. >> i am sure the whole house and indeed the whole country will join the honorable lady and join me in paying tribute to this nurse and giving all our sympathies. she clearly loved her job, loved her work, cared deeply about health of her patients, and what has happened is a complete tragedy. there are many lessons that will need to be learned. i echo what she said about what in the press keep their distance. >> is the prime minister still intending to introduce to snooper's chartaer? does he realize that he will be spying and more people in britain than even all the press barons put together? did -- where did he get his advice and ideas from? >> i really believe on
to bring an umbrella with you. meanwhile, into greece and italy though, thunderstorm activity firing up across this area. it will start to pull off to the east. for the time being, continued to linger. the storms continue to fire up. as far as temperatures into the east, moscow, minus 14 for your high. further to west berlin, 4. a mild 8 and 9 in london and paris. here's a look at your extended forecast. >>> and that concludes this edition of "newsline." i'm keikichi hanada. we'll be back at the top of the hour. thank you for joining us on nhk world. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
european countries. the gender gap in pay is smallest in greece and norway. the researchers say one reason for the gender gap as many women work in poorly paid part-time jobs. that also affect retirement pensions. the gender gap among retirees is bigger in germany than in any other developed country. one possible solution, experts say, is more child care opportunities. she left her career -- stayed with it because of child care options offered by her company. >> calling for nationwide protests next week following the first round of voting on the new constitution in germany -- in egypt. 56% voted in favor of the draft. >> they are complaining of numerous voting irregularities and are declaring every count. they say it paves the way for islamic law and as a threat to the christian minority as well as civil rights. official referendum results will only be known after a second round of voting next weekend. the german government has expressed concern over the situation in egypt. >> the minister for development said an unstable egypt would be a security risk for the entire region. he said, "the
have been gathering to make flowers and teddy bears. it is a focus of this community's greece. my colleague is up outside sandy hook elementary school with us now. that memorial, i visited yesterday morning and this evening. it is really extraordinary have people have wanted to come there to express their sadness about what happened. >> people are coming here now. they're coming to lay flowers. there are christmas trees here. there are trees for all of the children who were killed and he will not say christmas day. this one is focused on avielle richman. she loved to ride horses. she loved to color her "harry potter"coloring book. these trees are california grown. she had recently moved here from the other side of the country. you can see that people are coming to light candles. they're coming to lay flowers. they are also coming most poignantly with teddy bears. every tree has a group of soft toys for the departed child. this really is a most agonizing week. two funerals took place together. there are many more to come. >> laura, i saw earlier a crossed that had come all the way
sebastian bach. >> oh john sebastian! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren't you home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now head
years away from being greece or italy? twenty years? i n't know. thisrendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good intentions and that go bad. clean energy's. >> solyndra. the tip of the a's spurred. dozens of companies go bad. the story behind the story. campaign contributors contributors, interest free loans from the government, distorting capital, it means resources are being used less productively and workers get lower wages and it adds up to the bad situation. john: president bush says it to oklahoma you take care of things it is good for the economy. >> collor you create a housing bubble. those people were the ones that had to walk out onto the plank then we all fall into the shark infested waters 87 tax credits. >> sounds great. but fr the tax code in 1913 only 14 pages we have warped into the 702000 page monster. more than 1,000 different forms to download. nobody understands. h&r block loves it but it is a news around the neck of the american economy. every page has something in it that sounds good but look what it adds up to 27 spending. the w
and reaching as far west as spain. to the east, it encompassed egypt, turkey, greece, and palestine, where jesus was born in the jewish land of judea, then ruled by king herod. >> in judea, the king, herod, was in effect a client king. he ruled almost in place of rome. he was the... he was the voice of rome, the instrument of rome, probably "instrument of rome" is best in that, because he... he had his own independent notions certainly. >> herod the great was probably one of the greatest kings of the post-biblical period in israel, but you wouldn't want your daughter to date him. he was ambitious, brutal, extremely successful. >> and it is one of the real untold ironies of jewish history that this man, who... who's the guy you love to hate in jewish history, really, leaves the most indelible mark on the face of the land of israel. >> it appears that herod thought of jerusalem as his showpiece. he really wanted to make it a place where people would come, just as people would have gone to athens, or rome, or the great cities of the mediterranean world. >> narrator: a meticulously accurate mo
of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resisted very strongly. the nazis had one of the most resistant mov
of the nobles should govern the affairs of men. she was looking back to greece and rome and the founding to figure out to figure out how much of the divided opinion as natural, how much is on natural and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have in his answer was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations. we all know them. if i could only be with my books and my farm and my family and at peace and rest of monticello. well, you know the road was open, she could have gone in new york, philadelphia, richmond, paris, london, holland. he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it because it has a young man he entered into what he called the board election between submission and the sword. the american revolution shaped him and grabbed him in the way that few historical defense i think have grabbed any generation or any man. i think that he thought of the revolution actually almost as an organic thing almost as a child than as an adopted or created by this group of men who would preserve it and make it and nur
another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resist
that italy and greece would be following in disaster. of course, they subsequently turned out to be the single best places to invest for fixed income in the world. not only did the sky not fall, but you had to do some serious buying to keep up with the others around the world. we have been buying an etf for my travel trust. was there a more uniform agreement than the idea that the euro had to die and the weaker countries were going into a fre depression? we know a ton of countries that could do very well in a low-growth environment. a year ago all the wise guys were telling us to avoid china because it was a house of cards. the course only grew more uniform with the chinese market falling to multiyear lows. but in the last few weeks, china's economy bottomed during the summer as they were focused way too much on beating inflation. now it's become the best performer in the world, and i don't think you've missed the move which is why my trust has been buying an etf that mimics china. finally there's apple. we've become addicted to apple. we are deeply focused on its decline whic
indebted developed country in the world. much worse than even greece. then look at demographics, a little known program that haunts japan, they are having ever fewer babies. they don't want mass immigration to top a falling population and they are living a whole lot longer. so they have a lot of seniors and a tiny up and coming generation. japan has the most extreme demographics in recorded human history. what are they doing b a it? -- about it? not much you can do to persuade liberated japanese women to have more children with very traditional japanese men. that's a huge problem. demographics, like a super tanker, it takes a long time to turn it around. but japan has just elected a new government which promises to get the country out of its 20 year malaise. how is it going to do that? the new prime minister wants to print a ton of money and huge stimulus plan building yet more infrastructure. does that ring a bell? have we seen something like that here? it really can be useful, you know, to look over there. it might show us over here where we might be going. not good. [ male announcer ]
side not the call side. they basically said to me, hmm we're not concerned about greece. we're not concerned about the economy. why don't you have these put calls they're really almost for free. we bought puts so we didn't have a loss in that drawdown. then we listen again. and we didn't have to -- again, we don't have to be that smart. okay. we're not that smart. again, we get into the next time, and draghi is talking about this, that the other, talking about this put and boy he did. he gave away this put. people not listening to it. you know what we did when we heard about that? we got invested. and that worked too. then we got into this election and said boy doesn't look like the market is going to be happy about this election, because obama is going to win. whether or not that was right or wrong, and they're going toish concerned about the fiscal cliff. we took down our position again. now when the market went down again, we said, okay, what are we going to do now? hmm, they're giving away call puts. call premium now. call premium traded really cheap. what should we do?
maybe greece, i guess, would take number one. >> we do know that the u.s. spends a larger percentage of its gdp on health care than any of the other developed nations by a fairly significant amount. so really tackling that underlying issue of what percent of our economy is going to health care in general is really the key issue, and we should be focused on that, i think, much more than the federal government's portion of it. and in this case where you have a proposal that would actually increase the share of gdp going to health care is taking us in the wrong direction. >> that is assuming that medicare spending equals medicare costs. and, again, as somebody who actually ran the program, i'm not assuming that. >> do you want to do that one? sure. >> david, this one is definitely for you specifically and aarp. the question is this: what scoreable savings proposals does aarp support for medicare beyond just better care coordination? does aarp support means testing, combining parts a and b cost sharing or medty gap reforms or anything else? >> well, i think it's important to remind every
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)